Monthly Archives: May 2018

OTN Ep #010: Young Stellar Object EC 53, and Gravitational Wave Source GW170817



In this podcast, we first share report  of a new brightening of a YSO – that’s a “Young Stellar Object” – known as EC 53 in Serpens Main, in ATel 11614.  A YSO is a star which is still in the process of formation, undergoing gravitational collapse, just as nuclear burning is attempting to get started in the core.  This YSO, EC 53, is observed brightening approximately every year and a half; and this report provides the first detection of a new episode of brightening. Then, in the second half of the podcast, we share the first reported detection of fading in the X-ray band of GW170817. GS170817 is a gravitational wave source, thought due to the inspiral of a binary pair of neutron stars, which was detected to have collapsed together, on the date indicated by its name.  Since that event, over 260 days ago, The source has been observed to continually brighten in the X-rays, as the hot remnant expanded larger and larger. From ATel 11618, we share the first report of the X-rays fading, indicating that at long last, the cooling of the remnant is overcoming its physical expansion, and the source will likely now fade, slowly, into nothingness.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATEL 11614  Catching the Next Burst: the periodic young stellar object EC 53 in Serpens Main is sharply brightening at 850 microns and at near-IR H-band and K-band.
  • ATEL 11618  Chandra observations of GW170817 260 days since merger: first statistically significant evidence for an X-ray decay.

Special thanks to Doug Johnstone, A. Hajela, and Mona Eltahawy.

 

 


OTN Ep #009: FRB 180309, MAXI J1535-571, and Nova V392 Per



In this podcast, we answer the question – what happens when what you are looking for, isn’t there?  We share two reports, one which looked for — and didn’t find — repeated radio bursts from a previously observed Fast Radio Burster (FRB).  Another, we share a report of a search for expected radio emission from a black hole candidate: the observers report their non-detection. Then, we re-visit from our previous podcasts, Nova V392 Per.  Observers share a a report of high resolution optical spectroscopy, and estimate the distance to this Nova.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATel 11605 High-resolution optical spectroscopy of Nova V392 Per
  • ATel 11606 Upper limits on radio afterglow emission and previous outbursts for the very bright FRB180309 from observations with the Lovell Telescope
  • ATel 11611 X-ray spectral hardening and radio non-detection of MAXI J1535-571

Special thanks to Mitchell B. Mickaliger, T. D. Russell, T.  Tomov, and Mona Eltahawy.

 


OTN Ep #008: MAXI J1820+070 and TCP J04432130+4721280 (Nova V392 Per)



We share a report of the black hole candidate MAXI J1820+070.  Observations of the source in the X-ray band have tracked its variability – in particular, its QPO (that’s, quasi-periodic oscillations) and found that the frequency is increasing with time, exponentially increasing with time. This is reported  in ATel 11578.   We also share reports of a bright optical nova V392 Per, discovered on April 29th — almost , but not quite so bright you can see it with your naked eye on a dark night, described in ATel 11588. Soon after discovery, another report arrived, in ATel 11590, describing that a new gamma-ray source had appeared at the location of Nova V392 Per.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATEL 11578  Exponential increase in X-ray QPO frequency with time in MAXI J1820+070
  • ATEL 11588  Optical Spectroscopy of TCP J04432130+4721280  (V392 Per) Confirms a Nova Eruption
  • ATEL 11590  Bright gamma-ray emission from TCP J04432130+4721280 (V392 Per) detected by Fermi-LAT

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.

Special thanks to Douglas Buisson, R. M. Wagner,Kwan-Lok Liand Mona Eltahawy.