Category Archives: Podcast

OTN Ep #011: Fast Radio Burst detected with CHIME and Outburst from NGC 1566



We share report from ATel 11901 of the first Fast Radio Burst detected with a newly commissioned radio observatory, called “CHIME”.  The Fast Radio Burst  is only 2 milliseconds long, and called FRB 180725A after the calendar date of its detection – July 25 2018.  Also, we share a report of Mid-Infrared Observations of the outburst of the Seyfert 1.5 Galaxy Nucleus of NGC 1566 from ATel 11913.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATEL 11901  First detection of fast radio bursts between 400 and 800 MHz by CHIME/FRB
  • ATEL 11913  Chandra observations of GW170817 260 days since merger: first statistically significant evidence for an X-ray decay.

Special thanks to Roc Cutri, Patrick J. Boyle, and Mona Eltahawy.


OTN Ep #010: Young Stellar Object EC 53, and Gravitational Wave Source GW170817



In this podcast, we first share report  of a new brightening of a YSO – that’s a “Young Stellar Object” – known as EC 53 in Serpens Main, in ATel 11614.  A YSO is a star which is still in the process of formation, undergoing gravitational collapse, just as nuclear burning is attempting to get started in the core.  This YSO, EC 53, is observed brightening approximately every year and a half; and this report provides the first detection of a new episode of brightening. Then, in the second half of the podcast, we share the first reported detection of fading in the X-ray band of GW170817. GS170817 is a gravitational wave source, thought due to the inspiral of a binary pair of neutron stars, which was detected to have collapsed together, on the date indicated by its name.  Since that event, over 260 days ago, The source has been observed to continually brighten in the X-rays, as the hot remnant expanded larger and larger. From ATel 11618, we share the first report of the X-rays fading, indicating that at long last, the cooling of the remnant is overcoming its physical expansion, and the source will likely now fade, slowly, into nothingness.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATEL 11614  Catching the Next Burst: the periodic young stellar object EC 53 in Serpens Main is sharply brightening at 850 microns and at near-IR H-band and K-band.
  • ATEL 11618  Chandra observations of GW170817 260 days since merger: first statistically significant evidence for an X-ray decay.

Special thanks to Doug Johnstone, A. Hajela, and Mona Eltahawy.

 

 


OTN Ep #009: FRB 180309, MAXI J1535-571, and Nova V392 Per



In this podcast, we answer the question – what happens when what you are looking for, isn’t there?  We share two reports, one which looked for — and didn’t find — repeated radio bursts from a previously observed Fast Radio Burster (FRB).  Another, we share a report of a search for expected radio emission from a black hole candidate: the observers report their non-detection. Then, we re-visit from our previous podcasts, Nova V392 Per.  Observers share a a report of high resolution optical spectroscopy, and estimate the distance to this Nova.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATel 11605 High-resolution optical spectroscopy of Nova V392 Per
  • ATel 11606 Upper limits on radio afterglow emission and previous outbursts for the very bright FRB180309 from observations with the Lovell Telescope
  • ATel 11611 X-ray spectral hardening and radio non-detection of MAXI J1535-571

Special thanks to Mitchell B. Mickaliger, T. D. Russell, T.  Tomov, and Mona Eltahawy.

 


OTN Ep #008: MAXI J1820+070 and TCP J04432130+4721280 (Nova V392 Per)



We share a report of the black hole candidate MAXI J1820+070.  Observations of the source in the X-ray band have tracked its variability – in particular, its QPO (that’s, quasi-periodic oscillations) and found that the frequency is increasing with time, exponentially increasing with time. This is reported  in ATel 11578.   We also share reports of a bright optical nova V392 Per, discovered on April 29th — almost , but not quite so bright you can see it with your naked eye on a dark night, described in ATel 11588. Soon after discovery, another report arrived, in ATel 11590, describing that a new gamma-ray source had appeared at the location of Nova V392 Per.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATEL 11578  Exponential increase in X-ray QPO frequency with time in MAXI J1820+070
  • ATEL 11588  Optical Spectroscopy of TCP J04432130+4721280  (V392 Per) Confirms a Nova Eruption
  • ATEL 11590  Bright gamma-ray emission from TCP J04432130+4721280 (V392 Per) detected by Fermi-LAT

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.

Special thanks to Douglas Buisson, R. M. Wagner,Kwan-Lok Liand Mona Eltahawy. 


OTN Ep #007: ASASSN-18ix, A New Millisecond Radio Pulsar from FAST, and MAXI J1820+070



In this podcast, we share three reports of recent discoveries.  The first is of an optical transient source, ASASSN-18ix. The discovery report suggests the transient is a classical nova- but it can also be a cataclysmic variable; they’re not sure which.  The second report is the first reported discovery of a millisecond pulsar, by a new radio facility in China called “FAST”. FAST is now the largest astronomical radio dish in the world, and it is only  just beginning to operate. The first discovery is of a millisecond pulsar which, the report suggests, is so faint, it could not have possibly been detected by the existing, less sensitive telescopes. And finally, we share a report of new behavior from the black hole candidate, MAXI J1820+070.     

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATEL 11561  ASAS-SN Discovery of a Possible Galactic Nova ASASSN-18ix
  • ATEL 11574  Optical/X-ray Flux Decoupling in MAXI J1820+070
  • ATEL 11584  FAST’s Discovery of a New Millisecond Pulsar (MSP) toward the Fermi-LAT unassociated source 3FGL J0318.1+0252

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.

Special thanks to K. Z Stanek, Pei Wang, Amanda Townsendand Mona Eltahawy.


OTN Ep #006: 3C 279 is active



In this podcast, 3C 279 is active. “3C” refers to the “3rd Cambridge Catalogue of Radio Source”, and “279” is this object’s number in that catalog, which was published way back in 1959, when radio astronomical observations were just a toddler. And though we’ve known about this object for decades, it has been observed to get bright, and then fade again — what we call, “an active state”.   This month, 3C 279 has been detected as “active” in three wildly ranging photon energy bands: in the gamma-rays, where it was first detected using the FERMI-LAT observatory, which is a satellite in low-earth orbit; in the Very High Energy range, using the MAGIC telescopes in the Canary Islands;  and in the radio wavelength band, using ALMA on the Atacama Plain, in Chile. With observations like these, astrophysicists are piecing together how high energy particles, magnetic fields, photons, and gravity, all work together, to produce emission bright enough to be seen, half a universe away.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATel 11542  Fermi LAT detection of renewed strong GeV activity from the FSRQ 3C 279
  • ATel 11545 MAGIC detection of increased activity from FSRQ 3C 279 at very-high-energy gamma rays
  • ATel 11572  3C 279: ALMA detection of radio flare in total and polarized flux densities.

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.

Special thanks to Herve Eulacia, Matthieu Guyonnet-Duluc, Seiji Komeno, Razmik Mirzoyan, Roopesh Ojha, and Mona Eltahawy.


OTN Ep #005: The Bit Character Returns: MAXI J1820+070



On today’s podcast, we bring back a past bit character.   You know what this is, don’t you?  When a show suddenly – around episode 5 or so –  turns around, and focuses in on what you thought was a bit character introduced back in episode 2 for five minutes? Somebody you could forget, because you’ll never see them again?  Somebody who didn’t matter to the main plotline to the show.   We intend to do this a lot on this podcast, to return to an object you may have heard about, then forgotten.

So here, we do just that: we return to something which you thought might be a bit character.  We share 3 reports — the entire show — on one specific object which made a short appearance in a previous show: MAXI J1820+070.  Observations are taken with the Very Large Telescope in the Atacama Plain of Chile; near Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates; in Russia,with the RATAN 600m radio telescope; and in New Mexico, with The Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) in the radio band.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website; and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATel 11533, A bright mid-infrared excess in MAXI J1820+070
  • ATel 11539, The 30-day monitoring of MAXI J1820+070 at 4.7 GHz
  • ATel 11540, VLITE meter-wavelength detection of MAXI J1820+070 at 339 MHz

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.


OTN Ep #004: Two Pairs



In this podcast, we share two pairs of reports.  In each pair, the topic is somewhat the same – reflected in the title.  But to the astronomer’s way of thinking, the objects are enormously different.  First, we look at a pair of “X-ray re-brightenings”, one of a B-type emission star, another of an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar.  And then we look at two spectroscopic classifications of supernovae — one of SN 2018aql as a yount type IIP supernova, the other of SN2018aqm as a type Ia Supernova.

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website, and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATel #11517 X-ray rebrightening of the Be/X-ray transient Swift J0243.6+6124
  • ATel #11520 X-ray rebrightening of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17379-3747
  • ATel #11525  Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2018aql as a young type IIP supernova
  • ATel #11531  Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2018aqm as A Type Ia Supernova

 

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.


OTN Ep #003: Why Swift J1756.9-2508?



We share reports on one specific object: Swift J1756.9-2508, an accreting, millisecond X-ray pulsar.  It was discovered in June 2007- suddenly bright, as transient sources can be; the 182 Hz X-ray pulsation was quickly discovered, but a month later, the object faded and disappeared from the sky —  and has been dormant since July 2007. Until just last week, when it suddenly turned on again. Hear about four different observations of SWIFT J1756.9-2508, here.

And then we ask the question: why are we even talking about this?

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website, and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

    • ATel #11497New X-ray outburst of accreting millisecond pulsar SWIFT J1756.9-2508 detected by INTEGRAL
    • ATel #11502. NICER Detects Pulsations from Swift J1756.9-2508
    • ATel #11505. Swift/BAT confirms the outburst of Swift J1756.9-2508
    • ATel #11523. INTEGRAL observation of SWIFT J1756.9-2508 in outburst

 

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.


OTN Ep #002: SN Ia 2018aoz, MAXI J1820+070 and ASASSN-18gq



We share three new reports — where the supernova SN Ia 2018aoz is Ultra-Violet bright; the optical and X-ray quasiperiodic oscillations in MAXI J1820+070 are of similar frequency, and astrometry and photometry suggests the Nature of ASASSN-18gq. 

After the show, we invite you to examine the results even further at our website, and join the discussion online at Twitter using #OutThereNow.

In this podcast:

  • ATel #11510:  Detection of optical and X-ray QPOs at similar frequencies in MAXI J1820+070
  • ATel #11511: Swift UVOT Observations show SN Ia 2018aoz/DLT18q is UV-bright
  • ATel #11518: On the Progenitor and Nature of ASASSN-18gq

From neutron stars, to black holes, to tidal disruption events, to gravitational wave sources, to neutrinos, to cosmic rays: Out There Now shares the latest, most eye-catching astronomy and astrophysics research results with you.